Stepping outside my comfort zone


Stepping out of my comfort zone.png

I’m a private person: I don’t shout about things that happen to me and I don’t ask for help easily. Which makes it all the more difficult for me to promote myself. I prefer standing in the background, rather than being the centre of things. And yet I know that’s what I’m going to have to do to succeed at publishing novels. Well, at least

Earlier in the summer we went to my cousin’s wedding. A beautiful occasion, with all of my family there. And lots of conversations about what I was doing now both the children were at school. And in none of them did I say anything about writing. I’m not really sure why I didn’t. But once I hadn’t I found I couldn’t start.

Afterwards I kicked myself, but there wasn’t much I can do then. So I stepped up my plans to launch my “Author profile”. I now have a Facebook page and a mailing list. Which I have been quietly promoting the last couple of months. At the weekend I took the big step (to me) of inviting all my Facebook friends to like my page. If I can’t invite my friends, then who can I expect to support me? I’d posted about the page, but Facebook’s algorithms don’t show your posts to everyone.

It’s a different fear when it’s someone you know, rather than someone you have never seen before and likely won’t ever again. But I did it. And lots of them have now signed up for my page. I’m sure that most of them are not the audience for my book, but they are still interested to hear about what I’m doing. Because they’re my friends. And I can then build a more targeted audience in the future. Somehow… Stay tuned to find out how that goes! I’m sure there will be many more occasions when I feel equally, if not more, uncomfortable as I did sending out all those invites. But now I can look back on this and remember that just because something is uncomfortable it doesn’t mean it’s not worth doing.

6 thoughts on “Stepping outside my comfort zone

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  1. From what I gather, most writers are introverted and don’t like to come across like somebody who’s trying to sell something. I would suggest at your next family/friends/social gathering when somebody asks what you’ve been doing, just say, “Oh, I’m up to Chapter 12.” Then stop. They’ll respond: “Chapter 12 of what?” And you say: “Of my book. Didn’t you know about it?” And they’ll ask: “A book? What’s it about?” And then give them something intriguing about it without giving away the plot, and that may prompt them to ask another question or two. And later they may tell others about what you’re doing, i.e., word-of-mouth advertising.

  2. “I’m a private person: I don’t shout about things that happen to me and I don’t ask for help easily. Which makes it all the more difficult for me to promote myself. I prefer standing in the background, rather than being the centre of things.”

    I feel pretty sure, Clarissa, that many, maybe most, writers would get this. I certainly do. I’ve always thought of a certain anonymity as being one of the perks of being a writer–as opposed, to say, being an actor where everyone knows your face. I want people to read my work while I carry on my life privately.

    But we do have to take on most of our own promotion these days and I think you’ve made a good start with your Author’s Page.

    1. Yes, that’s true. I know I’m not alone, but that doesn’t make it any easier. And thank you for your kind words!

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