Writing progress


In February I wrote about how I was starting to write. And I’m pleased to say that I’ve continued. I’ve written at least 100 words every day this year. Some days much more than that. In total I’ve written over 65k words, 39k of which is on my main story.

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My novel is taking shape – I think I’m about two thirds in. Though the original story idea has got somewhat waylaid by a love triangle that’s created itself. My original heroine has found herself two men! And somehow their interactions are taking centre stage and the whole slightly scary story is being nearly forgotten. And whenever I’m not sure what’s going to happen my main character makes herself a cup of tea!

Writing this has made me realise how much there is to writing a novel. I’ve read hundreds of them, but I’m only now appreciating the character development and plot arcs that make up a good story. And then you get the setting, dialogue, world building, backstory, descriptions, conflict, as well as trying to show not tell what’s going on. Also the skills of outlining (I’m struggling at the moment as my plan for this story isn’t good enough – next time I will do more detail before I start!) as well as researching random things. It really makes me appreciate good literature more. And is making me more aware of what I don’t like in stories that I read and don’t seem to work so well. Reading more critically is something I want to work on too!

All this does make me realise how rubbish my story is. So once I’ve finished it I will hide it in a dark corner and start another one. I will have it there to prove to myself that I can do it, and then I will write something better. And rinse and repeat til I am happier with what I produce and dare to show it to anyone else!

2 thoughts on “Writing progress

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  1. “…the original story idea has got somewhat waylaid by a love triangle that’s created itself.”
    Ah, great characters are always headstrong, refusing to settle for the confining storylines we originally give them. Instead, they run away with the plot, introduce us to friends, lovers, and enemies of their own choosing, and determine their own motivations.
    Wonderful that you’ve been so disciplined about your writing!

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